Building a Brick Oven at Pennsic

Camp Crook’d Cat in on the Serengeti, on The Strand near the solar showers. The camp focuses on cooking period meals over a campfire and in a brick oven. These photos were taken on Setup Sunday of Pennsic 45.2016-08-01-10-57-14

Before the oven goes in, a wooden box is constructed and filled with dirt. This adds to fire safety and provides a level space to build the oven floor. The floor and roof are made from paving tiles, and the sides are built with brick.

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Making sure the floor is flat is critical for even cooking, so we use a carpenter’s level to check the paving stones’ alignment. We make sure to check each paving stone as it is added to the oven.

 

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Finally, the oven floor is complete. Note how the tiles butt against each other, with no cracks running the length of the oven.

 

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The first row of bricks for the oven walls are leveled, and carefully measured against the oven doors. Sometimes we can use doors for a few years.

 

 

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Because the Pennsic site is on top of a bed of clay, we can use clay and water to cement the bricks. Mudding the bricks is very similar to frosting a cake. As each row of brick is added, we check it with a level and use extra clay and small stones to ensure the walls are even.

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The third layer of bricks juts into the oven to form a shelf for trays of bread. Cakes, pies and other baked things also use these shelves.

 

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Every row requires verification that the oven is being built evenly. It’s annoying, but uneven ovens don’t bake at a constant temperature. (The one picture I wish I could share would show the walls having its alignment tested. This also helps the oven bake evenly.)2016-08-01-16-25-09

The top of the oven is completed with large paving stones. Mudded bricks cover the crack on the top of the oven, ensuring even heating throughout.

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Here’s the completed oven, waiting for logs to be shoved inside so it can heat. Doors at both ends make this part of the process easier and safer for the cooks.

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